Keep your Language Learning on Track in 2019 with Lingua Centra’s Language Practice Tracker

Have you made a new year’s resolution to learn a new language and not sure where to begin? Are you a seasoned learner, but losing momentum in your journey towards fluency?Lingua Centra logo

We know it can be difficult to keep your language learning on track while working full time or juggling professional, personal and family commitments. We had a whirlwind year in 2018 buying our first home, renovating, starting new jobs and getting married, and we noticed our language learning was taking a real back seat.

This was really disappointing for us as we are super passionate polyglots, so we tried to find a way to make it easier to work our language learning into our lives by breaking down learning into smaller, more manageable chunks. This led us to design our own Language Practice Tracker that works really well for us that we want to share as it might be helpful for you too! By following this tracker, we’re feeling more confident with our French and can see how much progress we’re making in a way that fits in around our busy lives.

So how does it work?

We found it was so much easier to break down language learning into a few fun chunks that you can embed into your everyday routine that, (when followed consistently) will give you a varied exposure to the language and help you on your way towards fluency. Check out the Lingua Centra Language Practice Tracker here as a PDF:

Lingua Centra Language Practice Tracker 2019

We created this tool to help keep up with our French, which we speak at advanced level, so you may see some of the tasks as more challenging. This is true, but some tasks can be adapted if you are just starting out with a language as a beginner. The main aim is to provide a range of activities you can complete each month to help you work language learning into your daily routine. The practice tasks we’ve included are based on key areas of language learning such as receptive listening and reading tasks, productive speaking and writing tasks, vocabulary acquisition and grammar tasks.

We’ve tried to include a real mixture of activities, with some tasks being independent and others involving communicating with others online, certain tasks being via video call or phone and some being intensive and extensively focused.

Download the chart above to kick start your own learning journey this year and use it to keep your momentum up with your language learning in 2019. Give it a go and let us know how you get on in the comments below or our social media channels!

Lingora – feedback from native speakers at your fingertips

If you haven’t tried Lingora yet, it’s definitely time to add it to your language learning toolkit. I signed up to Lingora to practise my French (advanced), Russian (intermediate) and Portuguese (beginner) and am so glad I’ve discovered this fantastic platform where a community of native speakers review my writing and speech and give feedback for free!


What does the feedback cover?
 So, there are 2 sets of criteria depending on whether it’s a written text or a spoken audio clip and native speakers can leave comments and rate your post on the following:

Audio files: Accent, fluency, pronunciation, intonation.
Written texts: Grammatical Accuracy, punctuation, spelling, style

So how does it work? It’s very simple and it’s completely free! You just:
1. Sign up on the Lingora website
2. Select the language(s) you’re learning and your level
3. Write a short text or record an audio clip of you speaking the language (there are really useful prompt topics and ideas to start you off)
4. Post your text or audio clip to the platform and wait for feedback to come flooding in from native speakers!

Watch our walk-through and review of Lingora:

Lingora is a great tool for your learning no matter your level – I tested it in French, Russian and Portuguese that I speak at very different levels and here are some practical tips and examples of how Lingora can help you improve at any level:

Beginner – post audio clips of basic sentences to get feedback on your pronunciation, intonation and stress. Or post short written sentences to get feedback on spelling and syntax (word order).

Intermediate – post written texts or audio files on specific topics to receive feedback on fluency, grammatical accuracy and style.

Advanced – find native speakers and use the chat and audio function to share more complex messages and set up tandem language exchanges.

Another fab feature is that each time you post, you earn Lingorocks that can earn you discounts on classes in the Lingora store. You can also earn Lingorocks by giving feedback on other people’s posts in your native language.

Lingora stands out from a lot of other language learning platforms because it gives you access to thousands of native speakers who can provide detailed, honest and constructive feedback for you on the written texts and speech snippets you share.

The best thing about being able to ‘prepare before you share’ any audio files or written texts is that you can check through your grammar and re-record sections until you’re happy to share the final result, unlike many live chat platforms where you can often feel under pressure to get everything 100% accurate first time.

Lingora provides a relaxed platform to improve your speaking, writing, pronunciation and grammar and you can be sure to get some really useful feedback too – within just 24 hours I had received 3 pieces of feedback from different native speakers on each of my posts!

Sign up to Lingora for free today and let us know what you think in the comments below and share with us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram !

(You can discover more Lingora features like lessons, podcasts, and amazing Lingorock discounts here on the Lingora website FAQs)

Introducing… Clare

Clare from Lingua Centra
At a rooftop terrace bar in Rome

I’ve been a language lover since an early age when a school dinner lady taught me how to count to ten in French during a lunch break at the age of 6! Now I speak four languages (English, French, Russian and British Sign Language) and am working on my fifth (Portuguese) and am keen to discuss and share my experiences with others on the journey of learning or mastering a language.

I started learning BSL age 11 when I attended a language lunch club at school to learn how to communicate with Deaf peers who were integrated into some of my classes. I’m now fluent and regularly attend events in London with Deaf friends as I can’t get enough of this visual-spatial language and being able to express myself without saying a word.

I started learning French at secondary school aged 11 and then picked up Russian for GCSE and continued both at The University of Exeter where I was social secretary for the Russian Society (more on this another time!). I lived in Russia for a year as part of my uni course, where I learnt a lot about language, culture and the ‘sink or swim’ feeling of being totally immersed in a language. During the year, I spent many an evening in cocktail and shisha bars with Iain on a mission to test out what we’d learnt in the classroom with our Russian friends who, luckily for us, were all very patient and supportive despite our limited Russian..!

Since graduating, I’ve regained my motivation for studying languages for the pure pleasure of traveling and socialising and have become much more focused on communication as a goal, rather than working towards an exam. This passion for raising the profile of language learning in the UK and unlocking languages to link people across the globe is why we established Lingua Centra. Through our website we are compiling a growing directory of language schools to help fellow linguists of any level or proficiency learn at home or abroad as well as listing other resources for you to realise the Lingua Centra mission that anyone, anywhere, on any budget can learn any language.

Follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook to join the discussion and share your top tips for learning! @LinguaCentra